FAQ

Can I change or cancel my order?

Yes - as long as your order has not begun the digitization process you can cancel or change your order. Just contact us at orders@memorylabs.ca to let us know what you need.

Do you allow for refunds?

We’ll do whatever we can to make your experience with Memory Labs a positive one. If you are unsatisfied with the service you received, let us know and we’ll do our best to make everyone happy. You can read our full refund policy here.

Can you convert copyrighted material?

No. Memory Labs digitizes personal items for personal use. We will not convert or reproduce anything commercial.

Do you digitize explicit content?

While we hope to digitize as much of your originals  as possible, our company and our operators reserve the right to refuse the digitization of certain items. Anything particularly disturbing, violent, hateful, or that the digitization team may find upsetting may be refused.

How should I prepare my material before giving it to Memory Labs?

Video and audio can and should be transported in their original cases/housing.


Photos, on the other hand, should be brought to Memory Labs loose; taken out of their cases, frames and albums.
You can send in an entire album if; you are digitizing the album itself (with affixed photos or important annotations), or if you have decided to pay the album-handling fee.
We’ll digitize and return your originals  in the same order that they are received.

How long does it take to get my files?

Each collection varies, as does the way you choose to give us your originals  and have them returned (in-store, local pickup or shipping), but generally we aim to have your files  to you within a week.

How will my originals be returned to me?

Your originals will be returned to you in a new and secure box based on their size and format.


Your originals will be returned to you in the order in which they were received as often as possible. However prints over 5x7 may be pulled out of order and returned separately in their own, larger, box.

Do you offer bulk pricing?

If your collection contains more than 5,000 photos or minutes, we are happy to provide you with a custom quote.

What does FADGI 4 mean?

FADGI is the Federal Agencies Digital Guidelines Initiative. Their guidelines articulate common sustainable practices for digitized historical, archival and cultural content. How strictly one follows these guidelines, and the output quality that follows, is rated on a numbered scale:


FADGI 1 - Very low quality 
FADGI 2 - Low quality 
FADGI 3 - Mid Quality 
FADGI 4 - Preservation Grade Quality


We follow these guidelines, and achieve FADGI 4 for all our work when possible.

What's the difference between album handling and getting an album digitized?

Album handling: If your photos can be taken out of their album you can either take them out yourself or pay an album-handling fee to have a Memory Labs lab technician to remove the photos for you.


Album digitization: If your photos cannot be taken out of their album, or the albums themselves have important annotations on them, you can send in your complete album to be digitized. Photos digitized directly in their albums, and the album pages themselves, are converted into the same Save, Show, and Share file formats as loose photos.

What is PPI (and how does it differ from DPI)?

PPI (pixels per inch) and DPI (dots per inch) both measure the clarity of a photo. The difference between them, however, is that PPI measures the number of pixels in a digital image while DPI measures the number of ink dots in a printed image. Generally, the larger your PPI or DPI, the more information and quality your photo will have.

What sizes should I expect my Save, Show and Share files to be?

Save copies are approximately 200MB .TIFF files.


Show copies are approximately 30MB .JPG files.


Share copies are approximately 1MB .JPG files.

What is an object level target and why is it important?

An object level target is a colour target that sits beside your original print photographs when being digitized as Save files. This targets provides something real, measurable, and consistent when adjusting the colour and maintaining quality control.


This is helpful during production and post-production, but it is also an important feature in your files as they are saved for the future. The target in your photo can be used for future adjustments allowing your photo the opportunity to benefit from technological advances and get better with time.


These targets are the industry standard, and are used similarly in museums, archives and other institutions.

What do you do to edit and enhance photos?

Show and Share photos have been edited and enhanced to look even better than the originals they came from.


In order to do this we crop, rotate and white balance each photo. We then adjust the levels of contrast and brightness. Finally we soften any dust and scratches, and sharpen the image. 


All this comes together to create a final photo that is crisp, clear, and beautiful.

What photo formats do you digitize?

We digitize: 


Prints (up to 14x16)


Slides


Negatives 


Albums

What is the difference between a Save, Show and Share photo?

Save: this is an uncompressed TIFF file that shows the photo as it is with no adjustments or crops. For prints, it also captures an object level target allowing for accurate colour correction. This file is meant to be saved as a reference copy, and is not to be edited. This is your ultimate archival or master copy.


Show: this is a high-quality JPG file that has been edited and enhanced so you can see the past through images that are better than their originals. These photos are perfect for editing, creating slideshows, printing and saving in online albums.


Share: this is a small JPG version of your show file. This size file is perfect for sharing your photos on social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

What do you mean by “museum quality”?

Memory Labs is the first consumer digitization service to use the technology and techniques of museums and institutions. Our processes are informed by the same guidelines used by these institutions, and our output meets the highest standards in the archival and cultural heritage industry. You can read more about our museum quality work here.

What resolution do you digitize to for photos?

Save and Show resolutions are: 


Prints and Albums - 1200 PPI


Negatives and Slides - 4000 PPI


Share resolution is: 300 PPI

What are annotations and how do you digitize them?

Annotations are anything written on or near a photo. They help to better explain who is in a photo, when it was taken, and what the context was. Annotations can be on the back of a print, the mount of a slide, or the page of an album. 


If there is writing on the back of a print, or on the mount of a slide, we capture that writing as it’s own photo with it’s own files (directly preceding the photo it belongs to).


For an album, we digitize annotations by taking a picture of the full page to capture all photos and writing in one photo.

How will my originals be returned to me?


Your originals will be returned to you in a new and secure box based on their size and format. So slides have their own unique box, as do negatives, albums, prints, etc. 


Your originals will be returned to you in the order in which they were received as often as possible. However, prints over 5x7 may be pulled out of order and returned separately in their own, larger, box.

What do you mean by “broadcast quality”?

The equipment we use to digitize your personal videos is the same state-of-the-art technology from Black Magic Design that broadcast companies and production studios use. Black Magic Design creates the world’s highest quality video editing and converting products.

What do you mean by “scenes”?

Video scenes are the different recordings that might be found on one tape or disc. 


If multiple recordings were made on one tape or disc, we’ll divide them up into their own MP4 files so that they stand alone as singular and unique movie. This way, you won’t have to go searching through a lengthy and varied file to find what you’re looking for. This also makes it easier to share and manage specific files.


When digitizing videos, you’ll only pay for the length of each recorded video, saving you being charged for any blank tape/space.

What resolution do you digitize to for video?

Videos are digitized to HD resolution of 1080p.

What size should I expect my Watch files to be?

Watch files are approximately 200MB/minute MP4 files.

What do you do to edit and enhance videos?

Each video is edited and enhanced to look even better than the tapes they came from. In order to do this we reduce noise and sharpen the footage, while also correcting colour and exposure. The final results are a crisp and beautiful video.

Do you digitize film?

No, at this time we do not digitize film reels.

What video formats do you digitize?

We digitize:


Beta 


VHS, S-VHS, VHS-C 


 Video8, Hi8, Digital8 


Mini DV SD, Mini DV HD 


Mini DVD-R, Mini DVD+RW


DVD

How will my originals be returned to me?

Your originals will be returned to you in a new and secure box based on their size and format. So MiniDVs have their own unique box, as do Digital 8, VHS, etc. 


Your originals will be returned to you in the order in which they were received as often as possible.

What audio formats do you digitize?

We digitize:


Reel-to-Reel


Cassettes


Mini Cassettes, Micro Cassettes

What do you mean by "tracks”?

Audio tracks are the different segments that might be found on one recording. 


If multiple recordings were made on one tape, cassette, or CD, we’ll divide them up into their own MP3 files so that they stand alone as singular and unique recordings. This way, you won’t have to go searching through a lengthy and varied file to find what you’re looking for. This also makes it easier to share and manage specific files.


When digitizing audio, you’ll only pay for the length of each recorded track, saving you being charged for any blank tape/space.

What size should I expect my Hear files to be?

Hear files are approximately 1MB/minute MP3 files.